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Welcome to my blog.  I document my adventures homeschooling and raising leaders of the future. 

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Back to School Meal Plan using Plant Paradox Diet

Back to School Meal Plan using Plant Paradox Diet

As we get ready to go back to school, I thought I’d offer a couple of meal plans to help you organize healthy lectin-free meals that your kids will actually eat. As a heads up - these plans contain more recipes that I usually make in a week. But if I’m feeling creative in the kitchen or have energy, I usually make a few special things. For example, I always make waffles or pancakes that we have in our fridge, but I’ll also make granola or another cereal in the same week. We always have smoothies and popsicles in the freezer, but I’ll also make cookies or bagels, but not both. And now that we’ve made these recipes so often, my kids are able to jump in and take over making them! 

Note for folks on the Plant Paradox Diet:

These recipes are currently being used in Phase 3 for our family, but most of them could be used in earlier Phases with minor adjustments (with the exception of the beans and quinoa). Many of of the meals have been adapted from paleo or vegan sources, so substitute accordingly (eg. avoiding soy by using coconut aminos for tamari, or using approved nuts and grains). I’ve tried to include links to recipe books and ingredients I use for both clarity and inspiration. Don’t be intimidated if you are in Phase 1 transitioning to Phase 2! You can use some of these recipes as a stepping stone and to add more delicious variety quickly.

  We love bento boxes! Since we are homeschooling, I don’t have to pack lunches; but even if I did, they would look pretty similar to the lunch and snacks listed below.

We love bento boxes! Since we are homeschooling, I don’t have to pack lunches; but even if I did, they would look pretty similar to the lunch and snacks listed below.

Back to School Lectin-free Meal Plan

When school is in session, I find it is easier if I set an intention at the beginning of the week for what to eat. Typically I will plan 5-6 dinners and then we have leftovers once or twice a week depending on our schedule. Sometimes we go out to eat for dinner, but not every week, and usually it is spontaneous. This collection of meals have been a home run for my 12 and 14 year old kids, as well as my husband. I hope you enjoy them too!

Kid-friendly Breakfasts

Lunch 

  • Slice of Applegate ham wrapped around avocado slices and tied with a chive
  • Tuna salad, made with avocado mayo, seeded and diced pickles + juice, green onions, and lemon-pepper served with
  • Frozen smoothies from our freezer that defrost by lunch time (see snacks)
  • Leftover dinners or salad to use things up

Dinners

  • Vegan Black Bean and Zucchini Tacos with a Garlic-Lemon Yogurt from Appetite for Reduction. I use pressure cooked beans I keep in my freezer and skip the salsa/jalapeños in favor of Frank’s hot sauce and veggie broth. I make the sauce with unsweetened coconut or sheeps milk yogurt, depending on what I have on hand.  I serve them with Cassava flour tortillas from Siete. This sauce is so special and easy to make, we use it on sandwiches, tacos, seafood, or rice bowls.
  • Moroccan Chicken with Prunes and Quinoa adapted for the Instant Pot using the book Slow Cooker Cooking. This makes fantastic leftovers for lunch for my husband. The recipe ingredients are similar to this one, but the book calls for slow cooking the chicken thighs for 4.5 hours on low. I’m not very fussy and just dump in 2 cups of quinoa to 2 cups of broth in the bottom of the pot after I brown the chicken, add all the other ingredients, and put it on the Poultry setting and let it go. There are not many slow cooker recipes that I like, but I’ve keep this book just for this one because it is so good. 
  • Veggie Stir-fry with ‘Hoisin’ sauce from Well Fed 2 (alternative sauce here but a simple sauce would have coconut aminos, garlic, green onion, a spoonful of almond butter and some honey or blended with a date if you want it sweet.) I love Melissa’s books - they taught me how to batch cook and create a formula that allowed for creativity without the decision fatigue of what to make for dinner. Melissa is awesome and you should check out her recipes and her blog.
  • Grass-fed hot dogs, cauliflower gnocchi baked in the oven like tater tots from Trader Joes, and a green salad with a honey mustard dressing
  • Paleo Fried Chicken Meatballs with salad or sautéed greens and leftover yogurt sauce or grass-fed sour cream.
  • Leftovers or fried egg sandwiches with avocado, everything bagel seasoning, and kraut

Snacks

  This picture of our fridge was from before starting the diet, but apart from the dairy and peppers and fruit it doesn’t look that different today. I usually put sauces and kraut on the top shelf, eggs and leftovers on the middle, and veggies on the bottom shelf and drawers. We keep dairy and meat in the bottom pull-out drawer.

This picture of our fridge was from before starting the diet, but apart from the dairy and peppers and fruit it doesn’t look that different today. I usually put sauces and kraut on the top shelf, eggs and leftovers on the middle, and veggies on the bottom shelf and drawers. We keep dairy and meat in the bottom pull-out drawer.

Bonus Lectin-Free Meal Plan: 
Fridge Foraging Edition

When I make a meal plan, I like to start with cleaning out my fridge and figuring out what I have to work with. This week it was some mushrooms, shredded cabbage, fish, shrimp, and eggs. Some of my go-to meals that don’t require a lot of planning are tacos, salads, frittatas, stir-fry, and rice bowls. I shop every Wednesday afternoon in the one hour my kids are at a piano lesson. So if I don’t make plan, I end up having to do it on the fly at the store. Sometimes that is fine, but often it is stressful.

Pro-tip: use a phone app like ToDoist to keep track of grocery items you need on the fly so when you are at the store staring at the shelves, you don’t have to remember what you were supposed to replace. I have a separate list for Costco/Trader Joes since I have to drive 40 minutes and don’t always know when I’ll be there next.

Breakfast

Lunch 

  • Egg salad with avocado mayo, mustard, S+P, and pickle juice on Olivia Superfree toast 
  • Ham Sandwich with kraut and macadamia nut cheese spread
  • Salad with pesto, shrimp, and avocado
  • Avocado toast with everything bagel seasoning

Dinner

  • Lectin-free sweet potato gnocchi with ghee, sage, walnuts, and balsamic
  • Fish sautéed in coconut oil, salt, and lemon juice, served with my favorite Shrimp Louie salad (sans-shrimp)
  • Har-Gow Shrimp balls with sautéed bok choi and basmati rice. I cook my basmati rice in a 1:1 ratio with water, a spoonful of coconut oil, and some salt in the Instant Pot for 6 minutes and then natural release for 10 minutes. For my husband and I, I also fry up on cauliflower rice in a skillet with ghee, but my kids won’t eat it yet.
  • Vegan abundance bowl with mushrooms stir-fried in aminos and coconut oil, cabbage, basmati rice, and roasted sweet potato discs (I’m obsessed with this vegan sauce. The recipe calls for pumpkin seeds, but you could make it with some blanched almonds or macadamia nuts.) This is a great use for little bits and pieces left over from other meals.
  • Shrimp tacos using wild cooked shrimp in my freezer and leftover fish from previous meals, cabbage, garlic-lemon yogurt dressing from above, avocado, and lime juice. I used to make Cassava flour tortillas, but we buy the Siete ones now so they are ready when we need them. I have a bunch of packs in my freezer with the Olivia Superfree bread so we don’t run out.
  • Caesar salad wrap in cassava tortillas with macadamia nut cheese or plain Kite Hill cream cheese and coconut bacon, if we have some on hand 

Snacks

A Labor Day Birthday BBQ Celebration: Plant Paradox Menu

A Labor Day Birthday BBQ Celebration: Plant Paradox Menu

Plant Paradox Diet: Phase 3 Update

Plant Paradox Diet: Phase 3 Update